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ASA is the essential resource to cultivate leadership, advance knowledge, and strengthen the skills of those who work with, and on behalf of, older adults.

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Caregiving

Membership Directory

Find ASA members in your area or who share your interest area. Enter a name or click on the magnifying glass to start your search.
 

Caregiving

In the United States, 43 million adult family caregivers care for someone older than age 50, and 14.9 million care for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia. The last updated value of that caregiving was $450 billion per year, and it only stands to grow. These caregivers need our help, and ASA supplies the information and resources they need. What are the latest models for preventing cognitive decline? How much will long-term care cost and what are the other options? How does palliative care work versus hospice? Are there intergenerational programs that can enrich the lives of those with dementia? Find the answers here.

 

Recommended

Online Learning: ASA members have free access to all web seminars. 

 

Why We All Should Care about the Direct Care Workforce

posted 02.21.2017

By Daniel R. Wilson

Have you ever helped an older person navigate the complexities of life—arranging transportation to a doctor’s appointment, setting up meals on wheels, or even ensuring they can see a medical professional—only to find out they are alone at home with no family or friends to support them? Who will ensure they are able to bathe each day and help them with the tasks of daily living we all take for granted? If you’ve ever cared for an older person, you know that the questions are endless.

The High Cost of Long-Term Services and Supports

Family caregiving can have a major impact on one’s current and future financial situation. Read the new blog from AARP Public Policy Institute’s Lynn Friss Feinberg, immediate past Board Chair of ASA, to learn how much families spend on the out-of-pocket costs of caregiving, and which families are most at risk.

Families Caring for an Aging America: The Current Landscape and Opportunities for the Future

On December 1, 2016 the AARP Public Policy Institute held a Solutions Forum featuring a discussion of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's recent consensus report, Families Caring for an Aging America. Learn more about the report, the event, the issues, and the call to action by viewing a sizzle reel that showcases the highlights from the Solutions Forum. Three videos of the full event are also available.

The Role of Family in Relocation: Basic Approaches to Easing the Psychosocial Stress of Change

posted 02.10.2017

By Crystal McGaha

Family members often play a critical role in helping to ensure loved ones continue to define their purpose and achieve their potential following major life transitions, such as relocation to a senior living facility. Older adults transitioning from their homes to assisted-living and long-term care facilities often experience high levels of emotional distress, which can result in long-term manifestations of depression, apathy, anger, anxiety, and decrease in overall well-being when left unaddressed.

Respite Care: Because Caregivers Deserve a Break

posted 02.09.2017

Respite Care: Because Caregivers Deserve a Break

By Joy Johnston

Family caregivers need, and deserve, more robust supportive services, but a break may be the most precious gift of all.

The Experiential Self and the Remembering Self

posted 02.09.2017

By Judy A. Cornish

In his book Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman explains the existence of our experiential and remembering selves. Although Dr. Kahneman is not thought of as an expert on dementia care, grasping this concept will greatly enhance your success in caring for your loved ones or clients as they experience dementia.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Start : 10:00 AM (Pacific)
End : 11:00 AM (Pacific)

Includes complimentary CEUs*

Register Now for Free

Seniors CONNECT for Health: Training Elders as Community Health Workers in Detroit

posted 02.03.2017

By Denise White Perkins

A tale of two seniors:

Mrs. Wixom is a 75-year-old widow. Her children live out of state. She suffered a stroke last year, and was recently discharged from the hospital after a heart attack. She has all her medications and a list of doctors’ appointments, but no car. She feels overwhelmed. She sits in a chair and stares out the window all day until it’s time to eat or sleep. She feels upset about how much her neighborhood has declined in 30 years.

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