ASA is the essential resource to cultivate leadership, advance knowledge, and strengthen the skills of those who work with, and on behalf of, older adults.

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Multicultural Aging

Membership Directory

Find ASA members in your area or who share your interest area. Enter a name or click on the magnifying glass to start your search.

Multicultural Aging

Will S. 744—also known as the controversial 2013 immigration bill that is now under consideration by Congress—affect the caregiver and clinical workforce that is sorely needed to take care of America’s growing older adult population? Can telemedicine help diabetic elders in rural areas get faster and better care? If Bangladesh can become an Age-Friendly City, what about your city or town? Will the Affordable Care Act have a positive impact on health disparities among lower income elders? Can we teach long-term-care workers to treat all elders with respect, no matter their culture? ASA works hard to foster diversity and cultural competence. This page gathers that information—from LGBTQ legal issues to end-of-life beliefs among American Indians—so you can use it to help build the best programs and models that elevate, celebrate, support and care for multi-cultural populations. 


Online Learning: ASA members have free access to all web seminars.

Network on Multicultural AgingThe Network on Multicultural Aging (NOMA) is a national community of individuals and organizations who are concerned with diversity and working toward cultural competence on all levels

LGBT Aging Issues Network: The LGBT Aging Issues Network (LAIN) works to raise awareness about the concerns of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders and about the unique barriers they encounter in gaining access to housing, healthcare, long-term care and other needed services. 


On Being an Aging Woman: An Annual Conversation

posted 02.28.2018

By Joan Ditzion, Phyllis Mitzen, and Connie Goldman

In 2006, Connie Goldman, Martha Holstein, Phyllis Mitzen, and Joan Ditzion, longtime professionals in the field of aging and longtime members of the American Society on Aging (ASA), realized there was no place at the Aging in America (AiA) Conference where we could talk with one another about our own aging pro­cess. We all voiced this same thought: “At the Aging in America Conference, let’s wear our per­sonal hats and talk about aging as us not them!”

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The Challenge of Intersectionality

posted 02.28.2018

By Toni Calasanti and Sadie Giles

In her exploration of social justice, Nancy Fraser (2008) argues that “participatory parity” is critical, “overcoming injustice means dismantling institutionalized obstacles that prevent some people from participating on a par with others, as full partners in social interaction” (Fraser, 2008). 

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AiA 2018 AoTA CEU Approved Sessions

AiA 2018 AoTA CEU Approved Sessions

ASA is an approved provider of continuing education for American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). Approval #3312. The following sessions have been reviewed and approved for AoTA CEUs. Other sessions not listed may be attended at the discretion of the Occupational Therapist but will not be eligible for AoTA CEUs.

Please note: The assignment of AOTA CEUs does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products, or clinical procedures by AOTA.

Winter 2018 Generations: Gender and Age: A Focus on Women

posted 02.22.2018

The Winter 2017­–18 issue of Generations lays out the physical, psychological, cultural, and economic realities of aging as a woman in contemporary American society.

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Learning From the World to Build Age-Friendly, Inclusive U.S. Communities

posted 02.13.2018

By Susan Mende

America is aging--with a rising number of people over 65. It’s a trend that is growing--by 2060, the number of older Americans is expected to more than double, rising from 14.5 percent of the population to nearly 24 percent.

Learn About the Aging Population Hidden in Plain Sight

posted 02.12.2018

By Carol Marak

Aging safely and independently at home is a natural desire of older adults. We want a space to call our own, and we prefer that place to reflect the person we’ve become, surrounded by dear friends. However, a large number of individuals ages 65 and older, 27 percent, according to the U.S Census, live alone.  

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ASA Chicagoland Roundtable - Jolt, Stories of Trauma and Transformation Event Details
ASA Washington, DC Roundtable - Ending Ageism & Reframing Aging - Your Role as an Advocate Event Details
2018 NASW National Conference Event Details