October 2015

posted 10.30.2015
This week Next Avenue released a list of the 50 most influential people in aging. The list is a who’s who of folks who are redefining aging, including thought leaders, executives, writers, artists, researchers, experts and everyday people. And, unsurprisingly, many members of the American Society…
posted 10.22.2015
By Laura A. Robbins If you are not already part of a group disadvantaged by prejudice, just wait a couple of decades—you will be. Unlike all other prejudices, ageism is relevant to every person fortunate enough to make it beyond a sixth decade of life. Unlike the attention focused on other…
posted 10.22.2015
By Moira O’Neil, Abigail Haydon, and Nathaniel Kendall-Taylor Advocates and experts working on behalf of older Americans have long suspected that media representations of aging are inaccurate. Scholarly research confirms this assertion. Compared to other age groups, older adults—particularly…
posted 10.22.2015
By Michael S. North Tom is not just a typical baby boomer; he has always been one of the hipper ones. A regular participant in Civil Rights marches, a Woodstock attendee, an open proponent of free love, and a career-long jazz bassist, Tom has always managed to stay at the epicenter of cool. But…
posted 10.22.2015
Read this entire issue on AgeBlog By Linda Barrington In June 2015, I happened to receive a promotion for a high-end business seminar, aimed at a market audience of corporate managers. The seminar offered a short course in retirement readiness, and promised to educate employers on best…
posted 10.22.2015
By Jean Setzfand and Mike Watson The topic of ageism and finances is broad, but nuanced. There are, however, two large, obvious clusters where age and money matters intersect: As people earn income, and as they save, manage, and protect their accumulated assets. Unfortunately, ageism in the…
posted 10.22.2015
By Karin M. Ouchida and Mark S. Lachs Dr. Robert N. Butler coined the term ageism in 1968 and spent his career trying to eradicate it. Unfortunately, despite his many accomplishments, “systematic stereotyping and discrimination against people because they are old” still occurs today (Achenbaum,…
posted 10.22.2015
By Barbara Raynor During the 1984 presidential debates, 73-year-old President Ronald Reagan was asked whether he was too old to serve—to which he famously replied, “I will not make age an issue of this campaign. I am not going to exploit, for political purposes, my opponent’s youth and…
posted 10.22.2015
By Ashton Applewhite Aging is life itself. That’s what makes it so damn interesting. But you wouldn’t know it from all the hand-wringing on the part of most Americans when it comes to the prospect. “Hey, it beats the alternative,” we mutter reflexively. What does that saying actually mean? The…
posted 10.22.2015
By John Feather First, the bad news: approximately 2 percent of American institutional philanthropy (primarily private foundations, but other funding groups as well) goes to aging programs (The Foundation Center, 2014). Now, some even worse news: that percentage has not changed substantially in…