February 2019

posted 02.13.2019
By Trent Stamp and Donna Butts Intergenerational shared sites, or places where old and young regularly interact or live with each other, offer incredible benefits for both generations. Whether at an intergenerational living community, an integrated senior/child day care center, or another…
posted 02.13.2019
From Today’s Geriatric Medicine: Home-based cardiac rehab is emerging as an effective alternative to center-based cardiac rehabilitation, with potential improvements in access and participation. A recent review of 23 random clinical trials observed that home-based cardiac rehab programs can be as…
posted 02.11.2019
When Susan Shelton’s 99-year old father, Chet, was a patient at the Anne Arundel Medical Center (AAMC), he received care that was tailored specifically to his needs. This unique experience is all due to AAMC’s Age-Friendly Health Systems initiative. The initiative aims to significantly improve care…
posted 02.07.2019
  Elder mistreatment is a serious concern in our society, with research showing that one in 10 Americans 60 and older have experienced some form of elder abuse. We also know that there are yet more cases that go unreported. ASA has made it a part of our mission to illuminate elder mistreatment…
posted 02.04.2019
As a cohort, older Americans do not act or vote as one bloc, and they exhibit disparities in well-being that can exceed those found in young adults. How does that bode for the future of their voting patterns? In “Nostalgia and the Swamp: Aging Politics in the Age Of Trump,” Guest Editor Robert B.…
posted 02.04.2019
By Robert B. Hudson To a degree hard to imagine half a century ago, older adults have become prominent players in American politics. From once having voted less than any other age group, now they vote more; from once having virtually no presence in Wash­ington, now they are represented by nearly…
posted 02.01.2019
By Laura M. Keyes, Cathy Boyer-Shesol and Mary Blumberg What age do you define others as being “old”? 55? 85? 105? It is hard to pinpoint an exact age of what it means to be “older” because health, ability and cognition may vary greatly among individuals. For instance, “My in-laws are 77 but they…