Healthcare & Aging

posted Mon, 2018-04-09 17:50
Older people also often are living with chronic health conditions and functional limitations that may contribute to frailty and disability. And climate change impacts not only physical health. 
posted Mon, 2018-04-09 16:55
We talk much less about people who were doing fine until they weren’t, people who had career choices, good jobs and decent incomes, until the wheels came off in their late 40s, 50s or 60s.
posted Wed, 2018-02-28 17:25
How one gerontologist’s way of thinking shifted parallel to changes in feminist philosophy and its embrace of intersectionality.
posted Thu, 2018-02-22 15:14
The Winter 2017­–18 issue of Generations lays out the physical, psychological, cultural, and economic realities of aging as a woman in contemporary American society.
posted Wed, 2018-01-24 19:34
Policies that limit immigration could worsen existing shortages of direct care workers across long-term-care settings.
posted Tue, 2018-01-09 16:08
The slow progression of vision loss means changes are incremental, only changing slightly, and leading to difficulty admitting to and asking for assistance. Many individuals try to pass, pretending to participate yet avoiding situations that would force them to admit their visual difficulty.
posted Mon, 2017-12-11 19:32
At the state level, many legacy Medicaid IT systems are old, with limited options for advanced care coordination. The dependence of many AAAs on these legacy systems makes it unlikely that most will be able to innovate to their maximum capacity unless and until they develop a business model to addre
posted Wed, 2017-11-08 16:11
In the In Focus Section of the November–December 2017 issue of Aging Today, we probe the troubling issue of elder abuse and neglect.
posted Wed, 2017-11-08 13:06
But when the person is ready to go home, she will find that Medicare Part A won’t cover the stay because she was never formally admitted to the hospital. All ser­vices received will be billed separately un­der Part B, as if they had been delivered in a doctor’s office.
posted Tue, 2017-11-07 05:17
Most people, especially baby boomers, who are at risk of having hepatitis C, don’t know it and don’t get tested for it. Most people who have HCV don’t know it because it usually doesn’t have noticeable symptoms for years. Many people don’t want to know about it because of stigma or fear.