Younger Onset Alzheimer’s Disease: Exploring the Emotional Experience and the Importance of Community

Start time
11:00 AM Pacific
End time
Noon Pacific

Part of the National Alzheimer’s and Dementia Resource Center web seminar series, sponsored by the Administration for Community Living.

Register now for FREE

Includes Complimentary CEs*

*This web seminar is approved for AoTA contact hours in addition to CEs approved for all ASA web seminars.

If you require ADA accommodation to participate in this web seminar, please contact Steve Moore at your earliest convenience to make arrangements – smoore@asaging.org

Living with Alzheimer’s disease is a challenge, changing life for both the person with the disease and their family. But what if someone diagnosed with this disease was in their early 60s, 50s or even as young as in their 30s? Younger onset Alzheimer’s disease affects people ages 65 years old or younger. Though the exact number of people with younger onset is unknown, the impact of living with Alzheimer’s in midlife is great. For more than 15 years, the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center in Chicago has offered Without Warning, a large support program for families living with younger onset Alzheimer’s disease. This presentation is informed by the experiences of Without Warning members. The web seminar will examine the emotional journey of younger onset Alzheimer’s disease and the importance of community in providing support.

Participants in this web seminar will be able to:

  • List four ways younger onset Alzheimer’s disease differs from later onset; 
  • Identify three common emotions in living with younger onset Alzheimer’s disease;
  • List four common changes to relationships for people living with younger onset Alzheimer’s disease; and,  
  • List four ways to encourage community for people living with younger onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Presenter:

Susan%20Frick.jpgSusan Frick is a licensed social worker and has worked for 22 years at the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center in Chicago. Since 2004, she has directed Without Warning, one of the largest support programs in the country for those living with younger onset Alzheimer’s disease. Her presentation is based on the experience of Without Warning group members.